Impact on water surfaces

A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single point about halfway down its length and shoots out a fast and extremely slender water jet. Here we impact thin circular discs a few centimeters in radius with velocities of a few meters per second. Combining high-speed imaging with sophisticated boundary-integral simulations we elucidate various aspects of this fascinating process.

Besides the intrinsic interest of understanding such a familiar and immensely frequent phenomenon, impacts can be of enormous practical importance in, for example, climate research: As every day billions of raindrops hit the surface of the ocean, each of them entrains a small air bubble. This constitutes the main mechanism of carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the sea. Furthermore, the oscillations of these bubbles are a major source of underwater noise and as such are crucial for sonar research. In medical physics, scientists are currently seeking ways to use thin liquid jets similar to those created during solid object impact for drug delivery through cell membranes or through a patient's skin.

See the links below for details about the different subtopics.

See the links below for details about the different subtopics:

Info: Devaraj van der Meer

Researchers: Stephan Gekle, Oscar Enríquez, Ivo Peters, Detlef LohseAndrea ProsperettiDevaraj van der Meer.
Collaborators: José Gordillo Arias de Saavedra
Embedding: JMBC
Sponsors: FOM

Publications

Supersonic Air Flow due to Solid-Liquid Impact[arΧiv]
S. Gekle, I.R. Peters, J. Gordillo Arias de Saavedra, D. van der Meer, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 024501 (2010)BibTeΧ
See also: Nature News & Views
See also: Viewpoint in Physics
High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact[arΧiv]
S. Gekle, J. Gordillo Arias de Saavedra, D. van der Meer, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 034502 (2009)BibTeΧ
See also: Phys. Rev. Focus, Vol. 23, story 3 (2009)
Bubble Pinch-Off in a Rotating Flow
R. Bergmann, A. Andersen, D. van der Meer, and T. Bohr
Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 204501 (2009)BibTeΧ
Controlled impact of a disk on a water surface: cavity dynamics[arΧiv]
R. Bergmann, D. van der Meer, S. Gekle, J.A. van der Bos, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 633, 381–409 (2009)BibTeΧ
Approach to universality in axisymmetric bubble pinch-off[arΧiv]
S. Gekle, J.H. Snoeijer, D. Lohse, and D. van der Meer
Phys. Rev. E 80, 036305 (2009)BibTeΧ
Noncontinuous Froude Number Scaling for the Closure Depth of a Cylindrical Cavity[arΧiv]
S. Gekle, J.A. van der Bos, R. Bergmann, D. van der Meer, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 084502 (2008)BibTeΧ
The origin of the tubular jet
R. Bergmann, E. de Jong, J.B. Choimet, D. van der Meer, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 600, 19–43 (2008)BibTeΧ
Giant Bubble Pinch-Off[arΧiv]
R. Bergmann, D. van der Meer, M.A. Stijnman, M. Sandtke, A. Prosperetti, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 154505 (2006)BibTeΧ


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Max Planck Gesellschaft
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