Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette (T3C)

Skin drag reduction in the naval transport, being the largest carrier of freight in the world, is of large environmental importance as this diminishes the fuel consumption. The practical concept is to create air lubrication alongside the hull of the ship, by injecting bubbles into the boundary layer. Several laboratory experiments easily result in drag reductions of 20% and above. However, application on real life ships barely results in 5%. A solid understanding of the bubble mechanism leading to drag reduction is still missing.

To investigate the mechanism behind bubbly skin drag reduction, our group has designed a state-of-the-art turbulent two-phase Taylor-Couette setup. Two independently rotating cylinders, with a fluid in between the gap, comprise a closed and energy balanced system. At constant angular rotation rates and constant fluid temperature, one only has to measure the torque that the fluid exerts onto the cylinder’s wall to get to the drag coefficient. The inner cylinder senses this drag by means of load cells imbedded into the setup. Microbubbles and millimeter sized bubbles can be injected into the setup.

The T3C is fitted with several sensors providing global information, such as angular rotation rates, fluid temperature, torque on the inner cylinder wall and bulk gas volume fraction. In addition, there are also sensors to provide local information, such as flush mounted hot-film probes for retrieving the wall shear stress, phase-sensitive hot-film probes providing power spectra, and single or quadruple optical fiber probes to probe the bubble distribution and bubble deformation.

The flow inside the T3C setup is optically accessible through its clear acrylic outer cylinder, allowing for measurement techniques such as 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry, 3D Particle Image Velocimetry, and laser Doppler Anemometry.

Besides two-phase flows we are also interested in single-phase turbulence. Many questions remain open regarding the features of highly turbulent flows. We aim to describe the fundamental properties of turbulent flows.

Below a video of the apparatus spinning up its outer cylinder:

Info:


Researchers: Ruben Verschoof, Rodrigo EzetaDennis Bakhuis, Pim Bullee, Chao SunDetlef Lohse.
Technical staff: Gert-Wim BruggertMartin Bos, and numerous of people of TCO
Collaborators: Daniel P. Lathrop (University of Maryland), Eelco van Rietbergen (Spaarnwater)
Embedding: MESA+, JMBC, European Research Network on Turbulence, ICTR International Collaboration for Turbulence Research. 
Sponsors: European Research Network on Turbulence, STW, NWO
Previous researchers: Sander Huisman, Roeland van der Veen, Dennis van GilsTim JanninkDaniela Narezo GuzmánPeter Dung, Michael Tang

Details of the apparatus

The Twente turbulent Taylor–Couette (T3C) facility: Strongly turbulent (multiphase) flow between two independently rotating cylinders[arΧiv]
D.P.M. van Gils, G.W.H. Bruggert, D.P. Lathrop, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 025105 (2011)BibTeΧ
The boiling Twente Taylor-Couette (BTTC) facility: Temperature controlled turbulent flow between independently rotating, coaxial cylinders[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, R.C.A. van der Veen, G.W.H. Bruggert, D. Lohse, and C. Sun
Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 065108 (2015)BibTeΧ

Publications

Exploring the phase space of multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow[arΧiv]
R.C.A. van der Veen, S.G. Huisman, O.-Y. Dung, H.L. Tang, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Fluids 1, 024401 (2016)BibTeΧ
Taylor–Couette turbulence at radius ratio η=0.5: scaling, flow structures and plumes[arΧiv]
R.C.A. van der Veen, S.G. Huisman, S. Merbold, U. Harlander, C. Egbers, D. Lohse, and C. Sun
J. Fluid Mech. 799, 334–351 (2016)BibTeΧ
Multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, R.C.A. van der Veen, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
Nat. Commun. 5 (2014)BibTeΧ
Logarithmic Boundary Layers in Strong Taylor-Couette Turbulence[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, S. Scharnowski, C. Cierpka, C.J. Kähler, D. Lohse, and C. Sun
Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 264501 (2013)BibTeΧ
Azimuthal velocity profiles in Rayleigh-stable Taylor–Couette flow and implied axial angular momentum transport[arΧiv]
F. Nordsiek, S.G. Huisman, R.C.A. van der Veen, C. Sun, D. Lohse, and D.P. Lathrop
J. Fluid Mech. 774, 342–362 (2015)BibTeΧ
Boundary layer dynamics at the transition between the classical and the ultimate regime of Taylor-Couette flow[arΧiv]
R. Ostilla Mónico, E.P. van der Poel, R. Verzicco, S. Grossmann, and D. Lohse
Phys. Fluids 26, 015114 (2014)BibTeΧ
Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow[arΧiv]
S. Grossmann, D. Lohse, and C. Sun
Phys. Fluids 26, 025114 (2014)BibTeΧ
Statistics of turbulent fluctuations in counter-rotating Taylor-Couette flows[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, D. Lohse, and C. Sun
Phys. Rev. E 88, 063001 (2013)BibTeΧ
The importance of bubble deformability for strong drag reduction in bubbly turbulent Taylor-Couette[arΧiv]
D.P.M. van Gils, D. Narezo Guzmán, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 722, 317 (2013)BibTeΧ
Optimal Taylor–Couette flow: direct numerical simulations[arΧiv]
R. Ostilla Mónico, R.J.A.M. Stevens, S. Grossmann, R. Verzicco, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 719, 14 (2013)BibTeΧ
Ultimate Turbulent Taylor-Couette Flow[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, D.P.M. van Gils, S. Grossmann, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 024501 (2012)BibTeΧ
See also: Viewpoints in Physics 5, 4 (2012)
See also: STW news of friday january 18th 2012
Applying Laser Doppler Anemometry inside a Taylor-Couette geometry - Using a ray-tracer to correct for curvature effects[arΧiv]
S.G. Huisman, D.P.M. van Gils, and C. Sun
Eur. J. Mech. - B/Fluids 36, 115 (2011)BibTeΧ
Optimal Taylor–Couette turbulence[arΧiv]
D.P.M. van Gils, S.G. Huisman, S. Grossmann, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 706, 118 (2012)BibTeΧ
Torque Scaling in Turbulent Taylor-Couette Flow with Co- and Counterrotating Cylinders[arΧiv]
D.P.M. van Gils, S.G. Huisman, G.W.H. Bruggert, C. Sun, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 024502 (2011)BibTeΧ
See also: Physics Today, January 2011, Exploring the extremes of turbulence
See also: Physics Synopsis: Heat and twist of turbulent flows
Microbubbly drag reduction in Taylor–Couette flow in the wavy vortex regime[arΧiv]
K. Sugiyama, E. Calzavarini, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 608, 21–41 (2008)BibTeΧ
Torque scaling in turbulent Taylor–Couette flow between independently rotating cylinders
B. Eckhardt, S. Grossmann, and D. Lohse
J. Fluid Mech. 581, 221–250 (2007)BibTeΧ
Bubbly Turbulent Drag Reduction Is a Boundary Layer Effect
T.H. van den Berg, D.P.M. van Gils, D.P. Lathrop, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 084501 (2007)BibTeΧ
Drag Reduction in Bubbly Taylor-Couette Turbulence
T.H. van den Berg, S. Luther, D.P. Lathrop, and D. Lohse
Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 044501 (2005)BibTeΧ
Smooth and rough boundaries in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow
T.H. van den Berg, C.R. Doering, D. Lohse, and D.P. Lathrop
Phys. Rev. E 68, 036307 (2003)BibTeΧ
Scaling of global momentum transport in Taylor-Couette and pipe flow[arΧiv]
B. Eckhardt, S. Grossmann, and D. Lohse
European Physical Journal B 18, 541–544 (2000)BibTeΧ


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Max Planck Gesellschaft
MCEC
Twente
Centre for Scientific Computing
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